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Category: ‘Memorable Events’

November – The Thankful Month

Posted: November 25th, 2015 by

Veterans Day, Thanksgiving and Birthdays, these are all days that are familiar November opportunities for Americans to be Thankful. But November is a special month in many other countries too.

Diwali – India’s Festival of Lights that symbolizes the victory of light over darkness, took place in November this year.

Accross the pond, in the UK, November 5th is always a huge celebration with bonfires and fireworks to remember the failure of a plot to blow up the Houses of Parliament and kill the King of England back in 1605.

Veterans Day,celebrated in many countries and originally designated to remember the end of the First World War, now honors all those who have sacrificed and fought for the freedom we enjoy today.

 

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And of course, Thanksgiving with it’s pilgrim origins, is traditionally a time for families to get together and create wonderful memories.

 

 

 

 

 

With families now scattered far and wide, travel is inevitable at this time of the year. So here’s 5 Tips that may help to make your journey back home a bit less stressful.

1)Remember to pack ‘patience’ It is estimated that 46.3 million Americans will be travelling 50 miles or more this holiday and they all want to get there quickly. So treat everyone the way you would like to be treated and remember to smile – it’s holiday time!

2) Don’t be a Gas Guzzler – love this hack from Michael Whelchel: Use cruise control when possible to minimize fuel usage. More importantly, find a large vehicle that’s driving the same speed as you and follow at a safe but close distance. The vehicle in front will block the wind and allow you to draft down the highway in fuel-efficient bliss.

 

travel snacks

 

 

 

3) Pack a snack – Water, fuit, veggies, protein bars, etc. Stock up from the supermarket with your favorite things or maybe make some yourself. Try these 15 HomemadeTravel Snacks that don’t need to be refrigerated

4) Don’t forget your chargers for your devices. Investing in a portable battery may save a lot of potential frustration.

 

 

 

 

sofa

 

 

 

5) Staying with family after a long trip may not be such a good idea after all. A nearby hotel that provides a Good Night’s Sleep for less might make all the difference to your visit.

 

 

 

 

 

Enjoy your Thanksgiving wherever you may be and may you always have plenty to be thankful for.

The Dream Continues . . .

Posted: January 19th, 2014 by

Dr. Martin Luther King Memorial, Washington DC

Dr. Martin Luther King Memorial, Washington DC

2013 was the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s infamous “I Have a Dream” speech, a milestone marked by many remembrances and memorials. As we approach this January 20th, set aside to honor MLK, we are reminded once again that we should never give up on our dreams, which are as varied as the people who dream them.

Tower of old Jamestown Church, ca 1639, shown in  1854 image, Wikimedia comons

Tower of old Jamestown Church, ca 1639, shown in 1854 image, Wikimedia comons

. . . including dreams that go back as far as 1607, when the English (some 100+ men and boys plus 39 crew members) established Jamestown as the first settlement of the Virginia Colony, traveling across the ocean to fulfill their dream of religious freedom and a better quality of life. Today Jamestown, and nearby Williamsburg, are a testament to these early settlers’ fortitude, and what once was their first home reminds us of America’s early history, which have also become popular tourist attractions, drawing people from all walks of life.

1870, Crouffit's Great Transcontinental Tourist's Guide, Wikimedia Commons

1870, Crouffit’s Great Transcontinental Tourist’s Guide, Wikimedia Commons

May 10, 1869 marked another milestone in American History, where the dream of the first Transcontinental Railroad was finally realized thereby enabling Americans to travel virtually from one coast to the other overland, connecting with the existing Eastern U.S. rail network at Council Bluffs, Iowa. The dream may have actually begun with Asa Whitney, the widely-traveled cousin of Eli Whitney (inventor of the cotton gin) who said, “[It] would bring all our immensely wide-spread population together as one vast city; the moral and social effects of which must harmonize all together as one family; with but one interest – the general good of all.” Others, like Dr. Hartwell Carver kept the dream alive, with an article published in 1832, where Carver advocated the building of a transcontinental railroad from Lake Michigan to Oregon.

Although the initial building of a transcontinental railroad was very much for commercial purposes, as it evolved it is also provided a means for tourism.
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Ten Musical Reasons to Like Halloween Plus Some Travel Trivia

Posted: October 24th, 2013 by

mask No. 10 Head to the sunshine state, more so to Miami, Florida to soak up the sun by day and then by night dress up like your favorite zombie and head over to the Massive Ideas Masquerade. For family fun, the Miami Zoo can’t be beat for its free range where animals are grouped together based on their geographic territory and exhibits are entirely cageless. Afterwards try a Cuban sandwich at La Carreta, the original Cuban kitchen.
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FREE is GOOD! Part 3 of a 3 part series

Posted: July 1st, 2013 by

Macy's 4th of July Parade flickr image by Joyce Andes

Macy’s 4th of July Parade
flickr image by Joyce Andes


Why not Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the birthplace of our country? You might head over to Great Plaza at Penn’s Landing for the Philadelphia Orchestra Neighborhood Concert or simply watch the fireworks at the Philly 4th of July Jam.

If Philly is not on your mind, perhaps the beauty of the Smoky Mountains is calling your name – so head over to UNC’s Kenan Memorial Stadium in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, to hear live music by Kenny Mann and Liquid Pleasure, and a spectacular light up the sky fireworks display. You don’t want to miss the watermelon eating contest as well . . .

Flickr image by NYC Marines

Flickr image by NYC Marines

Nashville “Music City” 4th of July celebration is a must attend event . . . “ If there’s one thing Nashville knows how to do, it’s throw a party.” . . . . “Get ready for a day full of FREE LIVE MUSIC (including The Band Perry), family fun and incredible fireworks in the heart of downtown Nashville, Tennessee at the Lawn at Riverfront Park.”

Flickr image by Curtis Palmer

Flickr image by Curtis Palmer

Why not “Spend the Fourth of July in the Nations Capital and celebrate with fireworks and festivals,” featuring an Independence Day parade with marching bands, patriotic floats; and then there’s the 90-minute music extravaganza with a “rousing rendition of Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture” and live canon fire!

Want to learn more, look at the links at the end of the blog.

flickr-byjustinday.jpg

No doubt your town or city has something planned, so why not grill up those hamburgers and hotdogs, then head on down to the fireworks display where the echo of ooohs and ahhhs can be heard as we celebrate America’s birthday! For more details on these events check out these websites:
http://www.townofchapelhill.org/index.aspx?page=514″
http://www.visitmusiccity.com/july4th/july4th_eventdetails
http://washington.org/article/10-ways-celebrate-independence-day-washington-dc

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We Remember . . .

Posted: May 22nd, 2013 by

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier - Arlington National Cemetery Wikimedia Commons Image Tomb of the Unknown Soldier – Arlington National Cemetery
Wikimedia Commons Image

Memorial Day is seen differently by many.  There are those who see it as a 3-day holiday, time to gather with friends and family for a backyard BBQ or a picnic in the park.  Others look at it as the start of summer vacation.  Depending on the area you live you might appreciate the warmth it brings; a real end to late spring winter-like weather.  Often young people see it as the official ending of the school year with visions of sleeping late or playing the day away. Late May is also a gardeners’ delight.  No matter how you view Memorial Day, there is one constant for the last Monday in May It is a Day of Remembrance.

Three years after the end of the Civil War, the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) established Decoration Day (with the first large observance held at Arlington National Cemetery) a day set aside to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers, on May 30, a time when most flowers were in bloom throughout the country. 

Memorial Day Flickr image by cwwcoff1

Memorial Day
Flickr image by cwwcoff1

Major General John A. Logan declared, in 1868, “to decorate graves with the choicest of flowers of spring time. . . we should guard their graves with sacred vigilance. . . let pleasant paths invite the coming and going of reverent visitors and fond mourners.  Let no neglect, no ravages of time, testify to the present or to the coming generations that we have forgotten as a people the cost of a free and undivided republic.”

There has been some dispute though as to the birthplace of Memorial Day with approximately 25 places named in connection with the origin of Memorial Day, and although many were in the south, the official birthplace of Memorial Day was declared in 1966, when Congress and President Lyndon Johnson declared Waterloo, New York as the “birthplace” of Memorial Day; then by an act of Congress in 1971, Memorial Day was declared a national holiday and to honor those who have died in American wars.  In December 2000, Congress passed The National Moment of Remembrance Act, to remember all of America’s fallen heroes.

Interestingly enough, tourism bridges all that is associated with Memorial Day, for the likelihood of travel is a given.

Viet Nam War Memorial Wikimedia Commons Image

Viet Nam War Memorial
Wikimedia Commons Image

Here is a list of some events taking place on Memorial Day ‘Weekend’ 2013

• Saturday, May 25 – 1:00-5:00 pm & May 27 – FREE admission – National Veterans Art Museum – Chicago, Illinois – Exhibit: Tenacity and Truth: People, Places and memories – Note: May 25 – 11:00 am – Wreath Laying Ceremony, Richard J. Daley Center Plaza, Chicago, IL – Parade to follow at Noon – on State Street (from lake Street to Van Buren Street) – For more information visit: www.nvam.org

• Monday, May 27 – 5:45 pm. (FREE admission) – across the river from downtown Wilmington, NCUSS Battleship North Carolina – 48th Annual Observance – visit www.battleshipnc.com/Events/MemorialDay

• Friday, May 24 – Monday, May 27 – Atlanta JAZZ Festival – Atlanta, GA / Chastain Park, Piedmont Park / Loews Atlanta Hotel – for complete schedule and details visit: www.atlanta.net/visitors/atlanta-jazz-festival.html

• Sunday, May 26 – National Memorial Day Concert – 8:00 p.m. (FREE) – West lawn of the U.S. Capitol – Washington, D.C. For more information visit:dc.about.com/od/specialeventphotos1/ss/MemDayConcert.htm

• Friday, May 24 – Electric Run – 8:20 – 11:00 pm – Begin from Home Depot Center – (Carson) Los Angeles, California. Check website for cost and details: www.electricrun.com/losangeles

• Here are some other sites to visit with details about their Memorial Day Weekend Events:
www.Brooklynmemorialdayparade.com
www.denver.org/what-to-do/museum-art/memorial-day-denver-weekend

Please join our company and employees, and our franchises, in taking a moment to reflect in appreciation for those persons who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom.

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2013 – Happy New Year!

Posted: December 26th, 2012 by

We’ve survived! The world did not come to an end on 12-21-2012!  It’s now time to celebrate . . .

220px-2000_times_square_ball_at_waterfordIt began in 1907, the iconic Times Square ‘ball’ drop at 11:59 pm capturing New Yorkers and a nation  to herald in the New Year.  This year, some 8 million plus folks in New York City alone, with an estimated audience of  over a  billion people throughout the world joining in to celebrate the new year of 2013.  The ball started out with 100 incandescent light bulbs, iron and wood in its construction, but has evolved over time, and with advances in technology, now features LED lighting, crystal panels and a much larger size. 

Other cities ring in the new year with similar drops: in Florida you might see a 200 pound Tangerine drop, or a six foot Queen Conch Shell (Key West),  Miami is home of the “Big 35’ Orange” drop, and there is the Peach Drop, broadcast worldwide from Undergound in Atlanta, Georgia.  Some not so well known drops include a 500-pound-steel-and-foam “Watermelon Ball “in Vincennes, Indiana; a “Sardine” in Eastport, Maine;  Traverse City, Michigan features a “Cherry” drop;pioglet Niagara Falls features a 10’ “Gibson Guitar” dropped from the Hard Rock Café;  Mount Olive, North Carolina features its ‘Pickle” lowering; Cincinnati proves pigs can fly when a “a Flying Pig” is part of their celebration; and, in Mobile, Alabama, it’s the “Moon Pie” drop . . . to learn more about hundreds of drops, lowering, raising and simply celebrating the New Year, visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_objects_dropped_on_New_Year%27s_Eve

What about other cities and countries.  How do they celebrate the New Year? 

Ecuadorians  use scarecrow like dummy’s to represent something that happened in the past year.  At midnight  the dummy will be put on fire, and as it goes up in smoke firecrackers are lit, adding to the festivities.  “Ano Viejo . . . Gelukkig Nieuwjaar!  So the Dutch say to wish you a Happy New Year . . . and the Filipino will wish you a “Masaya Bagong Taon” while Romanians say “An Nou Fericit” and Spaniards will utter “Feliz Ano Nuevo” . . .

Adding to many well wishes in a variety of languages are various traditions, like wearing yellow to enhance your chance for abundance and more money … something many in South American countries subscribe to; however,  in other areas food is part of the New Year celebration.  Some foods  represent money (cabbage), living a long life (sauerkraut), 12 grapes (happiness), or a traditional black-eyed peas, ham and collard green meal for health, wealth and happiness.

Perhaps the last, and hopefully the most enduring, tradition for the New Year are the resolutions, which dates back to the early Babylonians when a popular resolution was to return borrowed farm equipment.  Today the number one and two resolutions (not necessarily in that order) are to lose weight and quit smoking . . . how about you, what is your resolution?

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